Lawson-Johnson, Frith


The wood that all three wood pieces are supported from is beech. The boat piece was to keep in context with the waves. The image is a cropped photo of one of the photos taken from the Video Telemetry screen. I have enhanced the colour of the image for clarity and put it onto banner material so that it looks like it is embroidery from distance. The second image is scanned onto perspex and has been scanned from my own interpretation of my brainwaves. I say it's my interpretation because I traced the image roughly, and coloured them in the same colours as were on the original scan.

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An Exploration of Painting by Frith Lawson-Johnson

My artwork, An Exploration of Painting is a symbol of education and furthering oneself through life, in an academic and emotional aspect.


The wood that all three wood pieces are supported from is beech. The boat piece was to keep in context with the waves. The image is a cropped photo of one of the photos taken from the Video Telemetry screen. I have enhanced the colour of the image for clarity and put it onto banner material so that it looks like it is embroidery from distance. The second image is scanned onto perspex and has been scanned from my own interpretation of my brainwaves. I say it's my interpretation because I traced the image roughly, and coloured them in the same colours as were on the original scan.
The last image is an outline of the same scan that I have personally drawn, using the same principle as the second image (coloured one.) The idea is that the triptic together could by some be perceived as a convulsion starting fading out into nothing. I thought that this was quite apt and positive for people able bodie and disabled to see how self assured I am with my condition, as it shows a confident and positive approach to epilepsy/disability, as it brings the beauty out of the dark and can show others they can be confident to, whatever condition they happen to live with.

 

I'm really passionate about my epilepsy as I got my epilepsy as a result of hydrocephalus (water on the brain). 1/3 of my brain was squashed and a shunt was put in to drain the cerebral fluid off. At the time of the operation I was 13months old, had been failed by the NHS (National Health Search) system and my Dad found me in a hydrcephalic coma. As a result of this damage I got 3 forms of epilepsy simple partial, complex partial and later on in life secondary generalised seizures.

 

Doctors predicted I'd be stupid to surmise and ‘statemented’ me with special needs which hindered me, as the support I got was patronising not helpful. I went to a world wide respected centre for epilepsy, called National Hospital in Queen Square where I was referred to Chalfont St Peter, they kept me in for diagnosis where I had a neuro-psychometric test and it they said I was in the top 2% of the population and could within reason strive to do whatever I wanted.

 

I spent 12 years working in the care sector with people with profound learning difficulties, emotional behavioural issues, and mental health conditions. I made it my mission to help others overcome their obstacles and not be ashamed of labels they have been given. I'm almost at the end of my first degree and hoping to do my BA, I then want to do my MA and eventually teach university students. So, I continue to inspire as I did in the social care sector for many years.

 

Yes I'm epileptic (a term many ‘people with epilepsy’ find offensive). Those who know me know I joke about my seizures. But I'm Frith. I'm not epilepsy. Some of my work is about my condition a lot is about society. I want to show with epilepsy and with health issues there is strength and having it can make you a stronger being then perhaps the next person who has not had to battle anything.

 

People need to understand epilepsy isn't a choice, but we're strong people and when you see us have a convulsion in public it's not put on or caused by drugs so an audience that jibes hurts. ‘Epileptics’ (people with epilepsy) are only ‘epileptic” when they are convulsing, they are just like anyone else they rest of the time.

 

Don't tell an epileptic how to manage they own epilepsy, advice is appreciated but till you live with it, you can't appreciate how hard it can be to manage life and a complex condition.


   

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